About the Blog
  • The focus of this blog is to provide useful content for our readers. In this blog, we will share interesting things about collaborative culture. We will write about problems that haven't been tackled, talk about P2P 2.0 which is in in full swing now, discussing a lot about a recession battered community and how students are looking at new innovative...
  • Read more
    What is Flipgigs?
  • At Flipgigs we are creating a talented student marketplace connecting consumers and businesses with a motivated, affordable network of students in High Schools, Colleges or Universities ready to help with part-time gigs and job.
  • Read more


  • Problem with Affirmative Action

    February 4th, 2014

    As admission decisions get mailed out and another batch of eager high schoolers graduate to college, I have been meaning to write about something I strongly feel about.

    As the strive for diversity persists in public and private universities across the nation, Asian Americans are finding it harder and harder to get admitted into the colleges of their choice. For many top-tier colleges are out of the question. As an Indian myself, this issue is one that affects my  future, which is why I feel I should take it upon myself to write about this.

    Having already taken several college courses on my own, both as a part of a program my school offers as well as over summers at the University of California in Berkeley, I’ve already had a taste of the general gist of the college schooling system. While taking Psychology at UC Berkeley I took note of those who surrounded me. I saw Asians, Caucasians, Hispanics, African Americans , all kinds of races. But as different as they may have appeared on the outside, they all managed to have one thing in common. An interest in education. UC Berkeley, which has banned Affirmative Action as a part of California’s 1996 Proposition 209, still managed to maintain a rather ethically and racially heterogeneous environment where minorities are able to achieve not because of an extra incentive given to them solely because of their race but because of the sheer hard work that they put in.

    I understand and fully agree with that it is inherently necessary to maintain diversity throughout student bodies. However, I do not exactly feel that Affirmative Action would be the best approach. While Affirmative Action was initially designed to help end racial discrimination , it does in fact the opposite. Lowering standards for minorities just to allow them to get into their school of choice also tends to lower their accountability. It should be fair game for all and minorities shouldn’t have to aim lower to achieve the same goal as everyone else. Statistics have proven that an Asian American who scores a 2200 or above on the SAT still does not have the chance of getting in as an African American with a 1900. A minority student may feel less of an urge to push themselves and reach their full potential because if they could get into Harvard with a 3.5 GPA , chances are unlikely that they would feel the need to try any harder to strive for a 4.0.

    Though most schools claim to have a more holistic approach in the admission process, I feel that they may be looking into the wrong places. Diversity in schools is indeed essential for an academic environment , but many students no longer identify with their race due to the fact that athey are second generation onwards and consider themselves American regardless of where they were born. As time progresses , an individual’s racial background will have almost nothing to do with the character of that person which is why the focus of diversity should shift to the way the student body thinks, and not how they look. Many colleges have a set political atmosphere where there could be 80% of the student body being Liberal and 20% conservative. While geographical factors and religious affiliation may be the primary cause of this effect, it causes the campus to be far more close-minded towards the less apparent quota.

    - Aakanksha Sengupta

    Market Research Intern & Founding Team

    Flipgigs, Inc.

        Posted in Uncategorized | No Comments »

    Why tutoring is a great part-time job for highschoolers and college students

    September 23rd, 2013

    Tutoring can be a great way for high school and college students to enter the workforce.  Not only does teaching others build relationships and provide help to those who need it, but it also reinforces the material that the tutor is teaching.  There is a saying that goes along the lines of  ”You don’t fully understand something unless you can teach it.”  This is definitely true in the case of tutors whose learning is reinforced with each lesson.  Here are some reasons you might consider if you are thinking about becoming a tutor:

    <b> The Pay</b>

    In addition, tutoring can be a financially rewarding job or gig for part time students.  Depending on your experience level, the subject matter, and the difficulty of the subject, tutors can earn decent money while teaching a subject they love.  Sounds too good to be true, right?  Well, teaching is no easy task and every person learns differently so you have to adapt to each person’s learning style and ability.  For example, if you love chemistry and love teaching it, be my guest.  Create an account on www.flipgigs.com and look for people who need your help.  However, be prepared to encounter people who may not share your passion for the subject and need help just to pass the class.

    <b> The Flexibility</b>

    Tutors are lucky enough to set their own schedules.  Maybe after school or lecture works best for you.  Choose the time that best fits your schedule.  Of course, plan your time wisely since even you have homework to finish and exams to prepare for.  Unlike a regular job you are your own boss which means that the hours you work are determined between you and your clients.  You can be as hard or lazy worker as you want, but your success depends on how much effort you put into finding and maintaining clients as well as the quality of your teaching.

    <b> Impressive listing for the resume</b>

    There aren’t too many resumes floating around that have “Tutor” written on them so having this experience helps distinguish you from other job seekers.  This can give you an edge when applying for high-level internships and jobs because it shows that you are educationally driven and able to work with others successfully and achieve goals.  What more can an employer ask for?

    So if you’re still deciding if you want to be a tutor, first find the subject that you excel in.  Check out www.flipgigs.com and ask the tutors there how they like it.  They can provide you with tips and tricks to make you the smartest kid on the block.

     

    Written by Henry Spivey for Flipgigs.

    Student Loans. Demystified.

    September 6th, 2013

     

    As thousands of students around the world make their way back to college, many of them are experience first-hand the notion of being in debt.  According to the chart from Sallie Mae, a leading student loan lender, Student Borrowing accounted for 18% of financing for college.  In addition, another takeaway is that Student Income and Savings accounted for 12%.  This means that on average, students footed 30% of their college bill.

    Source: Sallie Mae

    Student loans can be a way to pay for higher education.  In other words, students are making an investment in their future.  However, the loan documents can be confusing and choosing the right loan is difficult.  This page is designed to help students and parents understand the basics of student loans and provide additional resources.

    To get a student loan, you will need to start off by first filling out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).  It is imperative that you fill this out because the Federal Government provides grants and scholarships to those who qualify.  To fill out the FAFSA you will need a copy of your last year’s income tax return.  Here is a list of Federal Grants that you can apply for.

    Grants and scholarships are essentially gifts to you to pay for your education and you do not have to pay them back.  Yet grants and scholarships do not always pay for the entire cost of attending college.  So that you’re prepared, I want to introduce you to the most common student loans.  They include:

    1. Perkins Loans

    These loans are available to all students: part-time, full-time, graduate, and undergraduate.  Highlights of a Perkins loan include: low interest rate, deferred payments, and no prepayment penalty.  Depending on your status, undergraduates can get up to $20,000 over their undergraduate years while graduate students can get up to $40,000 of over their graduate years.

    2. Stafford Loans

    Like the Perkins Loans, these loans are available to all students.  Highlights of this loan include: flexible repayment options, fixed interest rate (6.8%), and the interest can be subsidized if you demonstrate need.   The loan limit ranges from $2000-$20000.

    3. PLUS Loan

    Lastly, the most popular form of a loan is the PLUS Loan.  These are unique because students can get large amounts depending on the cost of attendance.  Careful! This type of loan can only be taken out by parents, so they will need to pass a credit check.  Unlike the other loans, interest is higher at 8.5% and is not subsidized.  Also, repayment begins 60 days after the loan is made.

    As you may have noticed, loans come in a variety of forms and can be a way to finance the cost of college.  The best way to get more information about college funding is to meet with a financial aid advisor at your college. They will be able to provide you information about scholarships available your college and other types of financing.  If you’re still seeking more information about federal funding, please visit these two sites:

    1. The Department of Education’s loan page (where you can view the Student Guide)
    2. The Federal Student Aid Direct Loans site

     

     

     

     

     

    Resumes are like houses. Here’s why I believe it.

    August 21st, 2013

    When you first look for a job, you probably start looking on www.flipgigs.com.  Then, all of a sudden you realize, “Wait!  I don’t even have a resume!  What are those again?”  People usually think of a resume as a fancy piece of paper with your education, experience, and skills on it.  Yet, there is more to a resume; it is a document that speaks to a potential employer.  Just like you want your house to scream “Buy me! Buy me!” to potential buyers, you want your resume to scream “Hire me! Hire me!”  In fact in many ways, a resume is like building a house; you have to follow certain steps to make sure you are left with a beautiful end product.

    Step 1: Design

    Before every house is built, architects come together to brainstorm what the finished house will look like.  If you are a job seeker, you need to brainstorm as well, but in a different way.  Start off by asking yourself these questions:

    • What is my career goal?
    • Have I received any kind of special award?
    • Where have I gone to school?
    • What other jobs have I had?
    • What skills do I have?

    The list is endless.  Employers love to see candidates who bring something new to the table.  Your focus at this stage is to brainstorm what content to include on your resume.

    Step 2: Foundation

    After the architects agree on a design, construction of the house begins with laying the foundation.  For a resume the most important part is your education.  Stating your education first shows a potential employer what your interests and how you can fit into the workplace.

    Step 3: Walls

    The next step in construction is building the walls.  Valuable experience such as internships, a long history of work experience, and volunteer activities can help build up your resume.  Haven’t found a part-time jobs or internship yet? No worries! Start by looking on www.flipgigs.com!  If you have tons of extracurricular activities and can’t decide which to use, I suggest adding the top 5.  Remember that you need to provide a short description of specifically what you did and its importance.  You want to show the potential employer that you did something useful and beneficial.

    Step 4: Roof

    No house is complete without a roof.  To cap off your resume, polish it off by stating your skills.  Skills?  From your brainstorming session, add in the skills that you are good at.  Maybe you are a good artist?  In the skills section write that you possess a fantastic artistic ability.  Support this by including your portfolio and any awards you have won.

    Step 5: Decorate!

    Walls? Check. Roof? Check.  Floor? Check.  Time to paint!  The last step in building a resume is to make it look professional.  This means choosing the right font, placement of your different sections,  type of paper, etc.  At the top of your resume add your name is large, bold text.  You want your employers to associate your name with your face.  Then add your contact information below your name.  Here are a few words about email addresses:  Make sure it is appropriate.  Would you want the potential employer to remember you as the person who has great skills or the guy who uses bananahammock@gmail.com? Create a new one if you have to.  Then add your career goal, then education, then experience, then skills.   Use Times New Roman font as it is a clean and professional font.  If you need a visual representation, check this out: http://bit.ly/15bjvsJ

     

    Remember!  First impression mean a big deal in the job market, so when it comes time to introduce yourself the employer, greet them with a smile, give them a firm handshake, look them in the eye and tell them why you would make a great employee.

     

    Good Luck!

     

    Written for Flipgigs by Henry Spivey

     

    How to Stay Sane While in School

    August 6th, 2013

    Here are some tips to keep you sane during the school year ahead!Don’t let the bed bugs bite! When you first move in, make sure everything is up to your standards. This should be taken seriously because you will have a miserable year if you don’t like your room-mate, the walls have holes in them, or your bed has bed bugs! Take the first few moments to take it all in and make sure you’re comfortable.

    Relax! Dedicate some time out of every day to relax. I prefer right after my last class to come back to the dorm and do nothing :) Of course, that doesn’t last forever so 20 minutes is usually good. That’s enough to watch an episode of your favorite TV show or get a snack or socialize a bit.

    Eat well! The college cafeteria is loaded with things you would probably reserve for a rat. Ewww! The chefs are focused on quantity, not quality. Keep your diet healthy, although I would recommend trying something new each week. Having the same old stuff every week will get boring :/

    Get to know others! It has been proven, although I can’t find the study, that students who get to know their professors perform better relative to their peers. Like a subject that isn’t exactly your major? That’s OK because professors enjoy hearing other students’ passion for a subject. Other than getting to know your professors, making friends and connections will help you while in school and beyond.

    Stay organized! College is all about time management. With so many distractions it can be hard for students to stay organized. Getting behind on an assignment can mean pass or fail. Don’t panic, however. Keeping a to-do list and a calendar will help big time! Most of all stick to your schedule (or at least try to!)

    Find a job on Flipgigs! Walking around your university will get boring after a while. Explore your surrounding city and find a gig in a local store. Check out Flipgigs to see who is hiring in your area. Employers post the gigs they need filled and people can reach out to them by stating their skills, what they’re looking for and find a job! Plus getting a job builds a resume by providing experience and, most importantly, cash!

    Written by Henry Spivey for Flipgigs